Surgical Smoke Plume Article Library - Laparoscopic


Title Category Publication Date Description Publication Author

 

Chemical Composition of Smoke Produced by High-frequency Electrosurgery

 

Aesthetics, Cardiothoracic, Dermatology, Drills, ENT, General, Laparoscopic, Laser, Orthopedic, Plastic, Plume, Saws, Smoke

 

7/1/2007

 

This study demonstrated the presence of irritant, carcinogenic and neurotoxic compounds in electrosurgical smoke such as toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene. This may have considerable implications for the health and safety of all involved in surgical practice, as exposure to these compounds pose potential risks to health.

 

Irish Journal of Medical Science

 

O.S. Al Sahaf; I.Vega-Carrascal; F.O. Cunningham; J.P. MCGrath; F.J. Bloomfield

 

Dissemination of Melanoma Cells within Electrocautery Plume

 

Dermatology, General, Laparoscopic

 

7/1/1999

 

Results of this study confirm that application of electrocautery to a pellet of melanoma cells releases these cells into the plume. These cells are viable and may be grown in culture. This release of malignant cells may explain the appearance of port metastases at sites that are remote from the surgical dissection or that were never in direct contact with the tumor.

 

Excerpta Medica, Inc., July 1999, Vol 178

 

John N. Fletcher, MD; Daphne Mew, PhD, MD, FRCS; Jean-Gaston DesCoˆ teaux, MA, MD, FRCS

 

Surgical Smoke a Health Hazard in the Operating Theatre: A study to quantify exposure and a survey of the use of smoke extractor systems in UK plastic surgery units

 

Aesthetics, Cardiothoracic, Dentistry, Dermatology, Drills, ENT, General, Laparoscopic, Laser, Plastic, Plume, Reamers, Saws, Smoke

 

1/1/2012

 

This study looked at the contents of surgical plume in the United Kingdom from plastic surgery centers. Their results revealed the equivalent mutagenicity and other hazards as smoking 27-30 cigarettes per day for OR staff. The contents of the plume were very similar to those of tobacco smoke and have the same disease causing capability.

 

Elsevier

 

D.S.Hill, J.K. O'Neill, R.J. Powell, D.W. Oliver

 

Surgical Smoke and Infection Control

 

Laparoscopic, Laser

 

1/1/2006

 

Gaseous byproducts produced during electrocautery, laser surgery or the use of ultrasonic scalpels are usually referred to as ‘surgical smoke’. This smoke, produced with or without a heating process, contains bio-aerosols with viable and non-viable cellular material that subsequently poses a risk of infection (human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus) and causes irritation to the lungs leading to acute and chronic inflammatory changes...

 

Journal of Hospital Infection

 

E. Alp, D.Bijl; R.P. Bleichrodt; B. Hansson; A. Voss

 

Surgical Smoke: A Review of the Literature

 

 

General, Laparoscopic

 

1/1/2004

 

Electrocautery, laser tissue ablation and ultrasonic (harmonic) scalpel tissue dissection all create a gaseous by-product, commonly referred to as ‘smoke’, that can be seen and smelt easily. Concern about this smoke has led to numerous investigations in an effort to determine what, if any, risks this byproduct poses to surgeons, operating room (OR) personnel and/or patients. Some of the findings from these investigations have led to significant concerns regarding the safety of surgical smoke.

 

Business Briefing: Global Surgery

 

William L. Barrett, MD; Shawn M. Garber, MD

 

Don't Be a Victim of Surgical Smoke

 

General, Laparoscopic

 

3/1/1996

 

If you saw a low-lying cloud that was labeled clearly with its contents, and the label contained the words benzene, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, methane, phenol, styrene, and toluene, would you go out of your way to walk through that cloud and inhale those toxic chemicals? Of course not. But you expose yourself to these same toxic chemicals each time you participate in a surgical procedure in which smoke from tissue . . .

 

AORN Journal, Vol. 63, No. 3

 

Beverly P. Giordano, RN, MS

 

Chemical Composition of Surgical Smoke Formed in the Abdominal Cavity During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy- Assessment of the Risk to the Patient

 

General, Laparoscopic

 

2/1/2014

 

This article discusses the finding of various xenobiotics in patient urine following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. These chemicals, including benzene, xylene and toluene, were absorbed by the patient from surgical smoke in their abdomen during laparoscopy and found by urinalysis post operatively. They also discuss various risk factors to the patient from the absorption of these chemicals, including the possibility of fetal harm.

 

International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, 27(2):314 – 325

 

Dobrogowski, Wesolowski, Kucharske et al

 

Health Risk Assessment of VOCs from Surgical Smoke

 

Aesthetics, Cardiothoracic, Dermatology, Drills, Electrosurgery, ENT, General, Laparoscopic, Laser, Orthopedic, Plastic, Plume, Reamers, Saws, Smoke, Urology, Veterinary

 

7/1/2017

 

The authors conduct a health risk analysis based on exposure to surgical smoke and length of exposure. They found an increased risk of cancer based on the quantity of benzene and formaldehyde found in surgical smoke. They recommend the use of a high flow vacuum device to remove surgical smoke at the source as a means of protection.

 

Creative Commons CC

 

Shaohua She, Gang Lu, Wah Yang, Mianwei Hong, and Lingfei Zhu

 

Health Risk Assessment of VOCs from Surgical Smoke

 

 

a, Aesthetics, Cardiothoracic, Dermatology, General, Laparoscopic, Laser, Plastic, Reamers, Saws, Veterinary

 

7/17/2017

 

The authors conduct a health risk analysis based on exposure to surgical smoke and length of exposure. They found an increased risk of cancer based on the quantity of benzene and formaldehyde found in surgical smoke. They recommend the use of a high flow vacuum device to remove surgical smoke at the source as a means of protection.

 

Creative Commons CC

 

Shaohua She, Gang Lu, Wah Yang, Mianwei Hong, and Lingfei Zhu